Yardbarker Nav Bar

Friday, January 14, 2011

Call Him Mayor Jinx! Mike Bloomberg sez Jets are going to the Super Bowl

Oh, great. Mayor Michael Bloomberg, the person who jinxed the Yankees' ALCS chances by yakking on his radio show about planning the World Series parade, has done it again. Today, on his weekly WOR radio show, Bloomy said that the Jets are Super Bowl-bound:

"The Jets are going to the Super Bowl. You heard it from me. The Bloomberg prediction,"the mayor said during his radio show.
In an article about Bloomy's comments, the New York Post compares him to Joe Namath guaranteeing that the Jets would win Super Bowl III. Oh, please. As if.

And by the way, even Broadway Joe in his "I want to kiss you, Suzy" phase could have had enough sense not to talk up going to a Broadway show, when most of the city's streets were rendered impassible thanks to the city's ineptness during last month's blizzard.

It wasn't enough that Bloomberg jinxed the Yankees with his parade-planning talk (and besides, what the heck was he talking about regarding planning a parade route. It's called the Canyon of Heroes for a reason -- the ticker tape parades do the same route every time!) Now he's done it with the Jets.

Yeah, yeah, I know I also predicted that the Jets would be going to the Super Bowl -- and even went as far to say they would win -- but I at least was right when I went out on a limb to say that the Giants would beat the Patriots in a Super Bowl. When has Bloomy ever been right on his sports predictions?

I'll let Jet fan Squawker Jon have the last word. He sez that the fact that both myself and Bloomberg think the Jets are Super Bowl-bound shows that we aren't really Jets fans. And given the worrisome comments I've seen from Gang Green fans on the blog over the past week, he might have a point!

What do you think? Tell us about it!

5 comments:

Uncle Mike said...

Oh, great. Bloomberg goes from "S.I. Newhouse" to "SI Cover Jinx!"

Lest we forget, who are the Jets playing? The New England Patriots, of Foxborough, Massachusetts -- halfway between downtown Boston and downtown Providence. And where is Bloomberg from? Anybody? Anybody? Bueller? The Allston section of Boston. Which includes Nickerson Field, the Boston University football stadium that was the first home of the AFL team then known as the Boston Patriots.

As Cleveland Indians & Browns fan Arsenio Hall would say, this is one of those things that make you go, "Hmmmm... "

David said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
David said...

Enjoy this interview with Wes Welker where he drops a few "footsie puns"!
______________________________

The karmic case against Wes Welker's press-conference footsie
E-mail | Print | Comments (10) Posted by Jesse Singal Boston Globe January 14, 2011 11:59 AM
______________________________

Sure, Wes Welker's press conference yesterday — in which he said "foot" or "toe" at a rate of about once a minute, probably in an attempt to tweak Jets coach and noted foot-enjoyer Rex Ryan — was funny. Very funny. But it has the superstitious part of me worried.

As many have pointed out, this week has been an accelerated primer on the difference between the Ryan and Bill Belichick schools of coaching. Ryan loves to talk. And talk. And talk. And he doesn't mind when his players get in on the act. The more verbal fireworks, the better. It's led to a pretty ridiculous — albeit entertaining — week of pregame trash-talking.

Belichick, on the other hand, embraces reticence like Dan Connolly embraced the football during his ridiculous, rumbling kick return a few weeks ago. He won't even answer basic questions during press conferences, let alone engage in verbal sparring with the likes of Ryan.

Belichick's penchant for keeping quiet is part of the Patriot Way, a larger, oftentimes overhyped concept that has driven the team during its decade-long run of success. It's not a complicated ideology: all that matters is preparing for the next game, and anything not directly connected to preparing for the next game is a waste of time — not least the endless hype and pointless speculation fueled by the media's obsessive coverage of the NFL. The Patriot Way puts a premium on the team over the individual, on shutting up and doing your job over getting caught up in all the nonsense that surrounds pro football.

For the most part, the Patriots had done a good job of heeding these guidelines, even as the volume of verbal ordnance coming from the southwest has flared since the Jets beat Indianapolis last week. It had the feel of a classic Patriots victory: one team gets caught up in the nonsense, but the Patriots don't, choosing instead to simply prepare for the task ahead and eventually prevailing, in part due to their professionalism.

So something feels off in Welker — who along with with fellow receiver Deion Branch really does embody the Patriot Way more than almost anyone else on he team — stooping to a Ryan-esque level of trash talk, albeit in a far subtler, more clever way.

I'm not saying it will alter the end result in Foxboro on Sunday, since the talent differentials, particularly at quarterback, will of course affect the outcome more than any abstract force. But still. If the Patriots do take care of business on Sunday, wouldn't it have been all the sweeter if everyone on the team had maintained Belichick's veneer of disconnected stoicism for the whole week?

David said...

Enjoy this interview with Wes Welker where he drops a few "footsie puns"!
______________________________

The karmic case against Wes Welker's press-conference footsie
E-mail | Print | Comments (10) Posted by Jesse Singal Boston Globe January 14, 2011 11:59 AM
______________________________

Sure, Wes Welker's press conference yesterday — in which he said "foot" or "toe" at a rate of about once a minute, probably in an attempt to tweak Jets coach and noted foot-enjoyer Rex Ryan — was funny. Very funny. But it has the superstitious part of me worried.

As many have pointed out, this week has been an accelerated primer on the difference between the Ryan and Bill Belichick schools of coaching. Ryan loves to talk. And talk. And talk. And he doesn't mind when his players get in on the act. The more verbal fireworks, the better. It's led to a pretty ridiculous — albeit entertaining — week of pregame trash-talking.

Belichick, on the other hand, embraces reticence like Dan Connolly embraced the football during his ridiculous, rumbling kick return a few weeks ago. He won't even answer basic questions during press conferences, let alone engage in verbal sparring with the likes of Ryan.

Belichick's penchant for keeping quiet is part of the Patriot Way, a larger, oftentimes overhyped concept that has driven the team during its decade-long run of success. It's not a complicated ideology: all that matters is preparing for the next game, and anything not directly connected to preparing for the next game is a waste of time — not least the endless hype and pointless speculation fueled by the media's obsessive coverage of the NFL. The Patriot Way puts a premium on the team over the individual, on shutting up and doing your job over getting caught up in all the nonsense that surrounds pro football.

For the most part, the Patriots had done a good job of heeding these guidelines, even as the volume of verbal ordnance coming from the southwest has flared since the Jets beat Indianapolis last week. It had the feel of a classic Patriots victory: one team gets caught up in the nonsense, but the Patriots don't, choosing instead to simply prepare for the task ahead and eventually prevailing, in part due to their professionalism.

So something feels off in Welker — who along with with fellow receiver Deion Branch really does embody the Patriot Way more than almost anyone else on he team — stooping to a Ryan-esque level of trash talk, albeit in a far subtler, more clever way.

I'm not saying it will alter the end result in Foxboro on Sunday, since the talent differentials, particularly at quarterback, will of course affect the outcome more than any abstract force. But still. If the Patriots do take care of business on Sunday, wouldn't it have been all the sweeter if everyone on the team had maintained Belichick's veneer of disconnected stoicism for the whole week?

David said...

Enjoy this interview with Wes Welker where he drops a few "footsie puns"!
______________________________

The karmic case against Wes Welker's press-conference footsie
E-mail | Print | Comments (10) Posted by Jesse Singal Boston Globe January 14, 2011 11:59 AM
______________________________

Sure, Wes Welker's press conference yesterday — in which he said "foot" or "toe" at a rate of about once a minute, probably in an attempt to tweak Jets coach and noted foot-enjoyer Rex Ryan — was funny. Very funny. But it has the superstitious part of me worried.

As many have pointed out, this week has been an accelerated primer on the difference between the Ryan and Bill Belichick schools of coaching. Ryan loves to talk. And talk. And talk. And he doesn't mind when his players get in on the act. The more verbal fireworks, the better. It's led to a pretty ridiculous — albeit entertaining — week of pregame trash-talking.

Belichick, on the other hand, embraces reticence like Dan Connolly embraced the football during his ridiculous, rumbling kick return a few weeks ago. He won't even answer basic questions during press conferences, let alone engage in verbal sparring with the likes of Ryan.

Belichick's penchant for keeping quiet is part of the Patriot Way, a larger, oftentimes overhyped concept that has driven the team during its decade-long run of success. It's not a complicated ideology: all that matters is preparing for the next game, and anything not directly connected to preparing for the next game is a waste of time — not least the endless hype and pointless speculation fueled by the media's obsessive coverage of the NFL. The Patriot Way puts a premium on the team over the individual, on shutting up and doing your job over getting caught up in all the nonsense that surrounds pro football.

For the most part, the Patriots had done a good job of heeding these guidelines, even as the volume of verbal ordnance coming from the southwest has flared since the Jets beat Indianapolis last week. It had the feel of a classic Patriots victory: one team gets caught up in the nonsense, but the Patriots don't, choosing instead to simply prepare for the task ahead and eventually prevailing, in part due to their professionalism.

So something feels off in Welker — who along with with fellow receiver Deion Branch really does embody the Patriot Way more than almost anyone else on he team — stooping to a Ryan-esque level of trash talk, albeit in a far subtler, more clever way.

I'm not saying it will alter the end result in Foxboro on Sunday, since the talent differentials, particularly at quarterback, will of course affect the outcome more than any abstract force. But still. If the Patriots do take care of business on Sunday, wouldn't it have been all the sweeter if everyone on the team had maintained Belichick's veneer of disconnected stoicism for the whole week?